Skip to main content

About your Search

20131230
20140107
SHOW
News 50
RT News 14
Today 11
Stossel 10
( more )
STATION
ALJAZAM 112
SFGTV 80
CSPAN 68
CNNW 55
CSPAN2 49
FBC 49
MSNBCW 49
KCSM (PBS) 48
CNBC 42
KPIX (CBS) 38
KGO (ABC) 27
KNTV (NBC) 24
KQED (PBS) 24
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 18
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 908
French 4
Korean 1
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 921 (some duplicates have been removed)
the amount of trust we can place both in the technologies that surround us, and the government that regulates it. together, we can find a better balance, and the mass surveillance, and remind the government, it really want to know how we feel, asking is always cheaper than spying. edward snowden released that christmas message to the british public.
and the future of technology. this debate may feel brand new but 30 years ago new year's day this very broadcast was devoted to privacy and surveillance. asking the question first raised by george other well ground breaking book "1984" that question, does the government know too much about all of us. let's take a look. >> welcome to 1984. 1984 is a year not the book. or is it? spy cameras scan our banks and even our streets and computer data banks compile lists of information on everyone. we're all leaving an electronic trail behind every time we use a credit card or place a phone call. >> i think in the united states big brother was born twins. >> guest robert smith was the editor of the privacy journal. >> does anybody here think that we are fast approaching the 1984 that george orwell described? >> the technology gone far beyond that. we not only have camera surveillance but computers which he did not foresee. we don't have the political climate clearly for total surveillance society. there are societies across the stacey that do have that mentality. if you combine our technical sophisticatio
to the heartland of america to find innovative ways to find technology to save the bees. late summer in barrett minnesota it is usually buzzing with activity. i think we are ready to walk down to the beehives. >> the midwest is known for the commercial bee industry. we have empty boxes not filled with honey. nothing. >> bee kooepers are witnessing an alarming problem. how many bees are we losing? >> the losses are avt ron omic am. i lost 65% of my operation last winter. we look in the ground to see if there's dead bees on the ground. most people in the u.s. would be happy staying away from the honey bee. >> they are critically important to the u.s. food supply. they provide $15 billion in revenue, and one-third relies on the industrious pollinators. the demand for pollinator crops, the fruit and vegetables, is increasing. the supply of bees is decreasing. the general term is colony collapse disorder, a phenomenon seen before, but this time it is different say the bee keepers. >> seeing a number of things that we have never seen before. bees just disappearing. >> not only disappearing, they are
into technology, business practices, operational processes. working with the government to do this. if you think that is a pipe dream -- i was invited to speak at the pentagon in march because they were attracted to privacy by design. privacy and surveillance. privacy and counter terrorism. they invited me back in august and we had a full day's session on how do you do privacy and counterterrorism. there was a lot of interest in this. we are working on this. let me put this on the table. it is not do not worry about the state. worry about the state. let's do something to assure that our privacy, which is the underpinning of freedom, it is a fundamental human right. it is just a personal thing. it is not -- it is the underpinning of freedom. it has a enormous societal value. sorry, innovation. >> when you talked about, in your papers, you talk about it not being a trade-off. it is not either or. you can have privacy and security by using technologies. you just touched on it a moment ago. explain how those technologies work. >> we talk about abandoning the zero-sum model where it is one or the oth
cover the global technology and media companies that are reshaping our world. our focus is on innovation, technology and the future of business. flying robots are coming. the faa approves drone tests in six states. we will tell you which states got the green light. user backlash over its pricing policy, uber has posted a holiday guide. can this save the company's reputation? we sit down with google's executive chairman, eric schmidt. find out what he sees as the future of technology innovation. drones have captured the world's imagination, especially after jeff bezos talked about amazon's test of delivery drones. drone flights cleared a big hurdle. alaska, nevada, virginia, texas, north dakota, as well as new york. we will see drones all over the place. it will allow the faa to test performance in different climates. >> this is technology that shows great promise, but it also brings with it significant challenges. it provides a structured framework where we are able to conduct research, test operations, and understand how we can safely integrate these aircraft into the national airspace.
you represent in that association? >> 2000 u.s. technology companies paid everybody who is involved innovation. >> water issues were concerned about? >> issues you would expect. innovation. innovation is a national strategy. keepcan companies could introducing the coolest products in the world. we dominate in many areas. it is a global phenomenon of innovation. the u.s. is the world leader. we want to keep it that way. the best and the brightest. a patent policy. it requires free trade. >> we will talk about those issues. i want to talk about the issue the fcc is hatching a. the unlocking of cell phones. >> we don't have a position. we are free market. we like consumer choice. we think that products with -- that consumers buy, they should establish a contraption will -- contractual relations. the government has decided that if you buy a phone in the contract runs out you should be able to have it unlocked. we have no problem with that. >> how important is the fcc to your members? >> the fcc says a communication strategy for the nation. if you think about all the growth in our econom
the tech industry goes to show off their gadgets and what they hope will be groundbreaking technology. the consumer electronic show begins next week in las vegas. more than 150,000 people are expected for the show where roughly 3,300 companies will be showing off their latest products. apple will not be among them. wearables is a major theme. jon erlichman will be there next week and joins us now with a preview from l.a. jon, what are you most excited about? >> you mentioned 150,000-plus people. when c.e.s. got started in 1967 in new york city, the audience was a tenth of that size. you saw the momentum behind things like camcorder, v.h.s., cd and every year we asked the same question. i would say that you got a mix of the obvious and the curious. will you see smartphones? absolutely. will you see cool television, 4k tv's? 100%. lots of wearable stuff? you bet. i hope to drape myself in wearables, see what works and what doesn't work. and connected devices and connected cars. we have been talking about this idea of audi taking advantage of what android has become. at the end of the da
you. moving on to agenda item number 8 which is assistive technology reclaiming independence in the community and the presentation will be given but councilmember derek czar zarda our very own. >> control room if you want to go ahead and put on the powerpoint presentation at the very beginning that would be fine. thank you. >> good afternoon counsel. my name is derek zarda i'm also besides being a councilmember an assistive technology coordinate at the center for independent living in san francisco i'm here to talk to you about assistive technology what it is and its role. but first i'd like to talk a little bit about what our center is about. so independent living resource center of san francisco, we are a disability rights advocacy organization that works to support and empower people with disabilities in leading independent lives and being active in their community and we champion the independent living philosophy. that the person with the disability takes the lead role advertise identifies what their needs are and creating steps to achieve those goals. i'm really p
but a building of great tradition and that's in our city. this whole faith is built on technology and really save in community because community is what yelp is all about. yelps success is living proof that american business doesn't want just service a small community but this whole community. from the beginning this torrid company acknowledged that this can be a good model of bits. and certainly there's no befrt place to test this model but in san francisco. consider where we are today 140 new montgomery street stand for innovation. the first sky skrarpt to be in san francisco. it was then the pacific telephone company. i've been using caving stone as means of communication but that was the innovation of the day. that was here in 1929 that, sir winston churchill made a telephone call for his 21st wedding anniversary he said why say the age of migraines it past it's just the beginning to today, we mark a new beginning it's called the monument for talk it's called yelp. today, we have the opportunity to celebrate the now global company community community community how many communities jeremy. whi
of the art technology. but we do have 8.4 million people here. we do have a daytime population that's over 10 million people. so you are going to have a lot of traffic and accidents. some people are saying that some police are not arresting enough people for reckless driving, that kind of thing. you have to -- you have to -- there are many court decisions that say this. you have to observe the violation. many of the advocates, i assume you're one of them, want us to make these determinations when we haven't seen -- we haven't observed the violation. it takes in depth investigations and examination, it takes witnesses. it is much more complex than you might think. >> yeah, technology and cameras, do they help in that case? >> are you asking me? technology and cameras do help. we have cameras in the patrol cars right now. certainly in the highway patrol cars. we are using state of the art technology to help our investigators go to the scene of the accident and doing the investigation more effectively and quickly. >> last question. >> police departments -- >> could you identify yourself? >> rick
in fitness and health technology that, perhaps, can make it easier for you to reach your goal. danielle cassagnol is with the consumer electronics association. how big is the fitness technology sector? > >the fitness technology sector is growing by leaps and bounds. it'll grow 37 percent in 2014 and surpass the 1 billion mark in revenue. so it's getting on more consumers radar. we're getting more products on the market and it's really starting to become a household product and technology that everybody is using to get in shape and also stay in shape. >>those are really big numbers. tell me about some of those really cool things we were just talking about this in wellness technology. >>sure. getting in shape as we know isn't just about working out or eating right. that's certainly a large part of it, but also drinking more water and sleeping more. there are headphones now where it's headphones in a headband and it uses binaral beat technology to induce a deeper more restful sleep. but if you are using headphones to get out and run there are options that use bone conduction technology and
represent in that association? >> guest: we have over 2,000 u.s. technology companies. everyone who's involved in innovation and has electricity going through it. or. >> host: and what are some of the issues that you're concerned about? >> guest: well, we for example on the issues you would expect the tech industry. we are focused laser-like on innovation. we want to make sure innovation is a national strategy and american companies can keep introducing the neatest products to the world. you know, we dominate in so many areas. we have a lot of foreign multi-nationals, it's a global phenomenon be of innovation, but the u.s. is the world leader, and we want to keep it that way which requires best immigration policies, the best and the brightest, it requires additional spectrum, it also requires a rational patent policy. you can invent things, but you're not being sued all the time. and it requires free trade. >> host: i also want to talk about an issue that the fcc is currently hashing out, and that's a consumer issue. the unlocking of cell phones. do you guys have a position on that?
, the technology that is used and how that has changed and how those changes laws will affect the way we think in the way we process ideas. the question i would pose to you is the one on the screen. hard day i wrote our ability to think, especially about complex issues and ideas, which are the very basis of a christian and conservative worldview. many people who thought deeply about these questions see the answer to that question is in pdf. one of them is neil postman who wrote a powerful book that we quote extensively called amusing ourselves to death. persons says all media have limited abilities and there are certain things that are just not able to do. postman's famous metaphor was postman was smoke signals, where he said smoke signals can communicate to you, for example, that i access, might even communicate to you where i am and that i have a desire to communicate with you. but it doesn't communicate much more than that. he don't know much about my philosophy, theology, loved, hates, desires, fears a cousin i smoke signals. smoke signals just do not have the capacity to communicate those
is interested in funding that increase in the department's budget. second to last, information technology. the department needs a new file server at a cost of 14,000 and maintenance for our aab, online system, which phase 1 is completed and we are now moving into phase 2 and we're on target for that project. we will need an additional 24,000 for that project. and finally, other recommendations by the committee, i'm happy to work with the committee as well as members of the board over the next several weeks to ensure that further guidelines that the department is interested in seeing be placed in the budget is, in fact, prepared so that when they bring it back to you in january, it will be close to being complete. that concludes my presentation. i'm available for questions. >> thank you, ms. covy. supervisors, any questions? >> yes, please. thank you for the presentation and your work on the guidelines for the clerk's budget. a question about premium pay. could you go into a little deeper describing what that is? what are the changes that you're proposing, what is currently the status of p
to invite the technology visionary that helped us accomplish this corridor. selena lowe from ruckus. please join me. [ applause ] >> good morning. ruckus has been selected by the city of san francisco as the technology foundation for this milestone launch of wifi along one of the most beautiful and famous thoroughfare in the world. i want to personally thank mark and the team for the support in collaboration that we enjoy in putting this and designing and implementing this network in record time. the launch of this service as mayor lee said is just the beginning and we are really really excited by the opportunity. at ruckus, we share a vision with the city of san francisco for a reliable wifi u actuality that provides not only free public access but also can serve as an economic stimulus for private and public online services. we believe this project will become a model for cities everywhere in the world. today, we are turning that vision into a reality. the mobile internet has changed everything in our life. anyone can tell you that wifi has become the preferred way to connect to the inter
to replace parts. >> space exploration, this is absolutely a critical technology. >> from diy medical solutions. >> we've seen the people who made the robo hand project. >> to life altering research. >> i'm dr. ben asser. our lab makes ears. it's alive whit goes into the printer and comes out of the printer. >> each is prototighting 3d printers aren't anything like your home printer. >> 3 printing is a process that makes physical objects. a 3d printer gradually layer by layer. not a picture of a cup of coffee but the coffee itself. >> he is a printing pioneer. >> every design file tells what the printer, where to put the material. what you see here is the printed speaker. in any design software you can go ahead and make changes. >> that information has been sent to the printer that prince layer after layer, hour after hour. >> what do we have here? >> we have here is the first entirely 100% 3d printed consumer electronic device. it's a loud speaker. >> why is this a big innovation? >> we have begun the second chapter, from passive parts to integrated systems. that can act, react. >> w
succeeded in a span of less than nasa now a company called space access invented technology to make a launching rockets much cheaper and it makes the money. >> continues the mission to resupply the international space station from u.s. soil >> why is this a breakthrough? >> i think the private space industry and space itself as a commercial opportunity represents tremendous new opportunity to -- opportunities for new services and products and jobs to be developed and deployed from the united states gives us a chance to have a new kind of industry even nasa being a customer for space x. >> that is how they make their money? >> they have other governments and private sector organizations that are recognizing we like to take a look how we can commercialize space other folks look at space tourism such as virgin galactic and others but but i think he has demonstrated he can put a rocket into space, he has delivered to payloads moving to commercial payloads and i think you'll open a whole new category for commercial space people tell understand you could make pharmaceuticals or products i
moving quickly to get their technology into the cars of the future. josh lipton tells us how your driving experience could soon be changing. >> next week, at the electronics show, google and audi are expected to make a big announcement, the two are expected to make information systems based on google's android software, the point they say is to give drivers access to music, navigation and services available on google smartphons.s >> in-car technology, like that next front. and mostly the car companies have kind of led the way on their own by developing the technolo technologies. but now, the companies have been delivering the mobile experience to our hands, realize they don't want the connection to be broken when they get on the card. >> streaming apps, on-road navigation are already part of the high-tech experience, but expect more changes in the future. new cars from audi, mercedes, gm, ford and honda are expected to have more sophisticated screens, and systems controlled by hands h hands-free, voice ac technology. google's rival, apple says they want to bring ios its operating system i
. and that has been touted as an innovative use of social media in modern technologies to do investigative reporters. but, in fact, that was being done by "the new york times" in the 1870s. the times passionately opposed abortion in its both editorial pages and news coverage calling it infant murder and saying the practice is rank and smells to heaven. in fact, one abortionist that was exposed by the new york times actually ended up spending seven years in prison as a result of those stories. and "the new york times" was not alone. between 1825 and 1845 as marvin olasky documented in the original version of this book, "prodigal press," over 100 cities and towns across america had explicitly christian newspapers including the boston recorder edited by a man named nathaniel willis, one of the most interesting and lively publications of its era. during that same period, new york city alone boasted 52 magazines and newspapers that called themselves explicitly christian. but, of course, we know that "the new york times" is christian no more. the times of today regularly editorializes in favor o
cover the technology companies that are shaping our world. our focus is technology and the future of business. let's get straight to the rundown. apple going to war with its corporate reported -- corporate appointed monitor for meddling in apple's business. netflix ringing in the new year with some big changes, rolling on a new pricing model while it loses the rights to popular movies. and the drone business is about to get a big boost, the fda selecting six dates for unmanned flight testing. it could generate $82 billion in the next decade. but first, to the lead -- apple engaged in a big fight with this over e-pointed monitor book price fixing. the court appointed a monitor to make sure it changes its behavior and reforms is is is packed this is, but that monitor says apple has been uncooperative and has made executives like tim cook unavailable for interview. he said the company has failed to turn over documents or make executives available. apple has been fighting every step of the way. apple accuses him of acting in an improper manner, saint have been overbilled and refused a
in technology and media from the last year. ,ncluding, the ceo of linkedin ebay, and disney. we spoke with industry innovators about the future of technology. we begin with one of the top of 2013,nd companies twitter, and its ipo. it went public and began trading on the new york stock exchange, raising $1.8 billion. the company has had a storied history. its cofounders all came together to celebrate that chapter. who were joined by the ceo grew the company from a scrappy startup to a global communications powerhouse. i caught up with them on the floor of the exchange on the day the twitter went public. i think the thing that may be surprised me most about the ipo is the almost spectacular understanding of the service that so many investors that we met with half. i would go in to meetings to sell them and they would show me tweets from folks like the likes .f sean white that.t's of examples like the opportunity to go talk to --ple who are your trying who you are trying to help understand your vision, it's tremendous. >> let's talk a bit about making money. you can turn a profit wheneve
where we cover the global technology and media companies that are reshaping our world. i am emily chang. our focus is on innovation, technology, and the future of business. let's get straight to the rundown. ces is about to kick off. google has turned out -- teamed up with automakers to bring its android software to your dashboard. worth $4 million? we have the ad rates for this years super bowl and once again it is a record high. -- social of multiple media, the question is why? the consumer electronics show starts tomorrow. this is the biggest gathering and technology. more than 3300 companies expected to be there and samsung is starting the conference off early. with a bang. staking out its territory. is announcing a giant tv with a bendable screen just minutes. -- man's ago. >> -- a few minutes ago. wing this.ust >> tell us what you think. >> i try to take people on an emotional ride. >> the curve? >> that was michael bay. he ended up walking off stage. you sort of feel for him in my line of work. they did announce a huge tv. 105 inches. they signed content deals with network's -- n
with another korean strength, information technology. they are building a new education system using i.t. in the hope it will give young people an edge in the future. nhk world reports. >> reporter: sejong is a new fast-developing city in south korea's central region. this elementary school boasts an education system. childrens and student use state of the art digital technology in the classrooms. the school provides free tablet computers to all students in the first to sixth grades. the tablets are linked by a cloud computing. the school says the system makes learning faster and fun. teachers can use the panels to display the students' answers or to bounce questions back to the class. >> translator: mathewsed to be hard, now it's fun. >> reporter: the technology helps teachers assess how well students are grasping the lesson. she frequently checks students' comprehension by e-mail. she can plot their responses on charts. >> translator: some students struggled with math, but now the lessons interest them, and their concentration has improved. >> reporter: children in big cities can imp
, and 3-d printers, the technology industry is in a frenzy over wearable tech. we'll have those stories and more as "real money" continues. >>> in colorado 24 newly regulated pot shops opened their doors to the public, giving the state's marijuana aficionados something to cheer about for the new year. on january 1st, a new law took effect that legalizes marijuana for recreational use. colorado is the first state where pot is legal just because. pot remains illegal under federal law, but that tension is not stopping tony fox owner of 3-d, denver's discrete dispensary, and you shifted from selling medical marijuana to 100% recreational use, what has been the comparison? >> 40 times as many sales as on average. the three years i was doing medical sales, we had 40 times the sales yesterday. >> 40 times yesterday. is that just -- compared to everything you sold over the last three years or just day by day? >> yep, basically, we had seen between 25 and 30 people a day for the last three years, and yesterday we were able to serve 450 folks and had to turn about 100 away. >> were you surprised
, and 3-d printers, the technology industry is in a frenzy over wearable tech. >> al jazeera's investigative unit has tonight's exclusive report. >> stories that have impact... that make a difference... that open your world... >> this is what we do... >> america tonight next only on al jazeera america new lights use low wattage led rights, neither harmful for the trees nor dangerous for the kids that may touch them. >> many play-off spots in the n.f.l. are still to be decided. mark morgan is here to explain it all. >> hey, a lot of anxiety in dallas, wondering what the dallas cowboys would do. tony romeo underwent back surgery. kyle ortman will start quarterback in the eagles game. sher een williams of the fort worth star telegram weighs in. >> that lees this game in the hands of kyle orten, he made 69 starts. he's 35 and 34. but has not thrown a pass as a starter and only thrown 15 passes over the last two years. it takes the pressure off the cowboys. no doubt about that. they can go in, play loose and >> an exclusive "america tonight" investigative series >> we traveled her
that technology and put it into the 777. the 787.n wider than there are already about 350 orders for this thing, call it 1000 orders for the 787. the thought is a as you have the long-distance routes, 777 becomes the more important plane. >> could we see -- say it for me -- >> 777's. >> ioduction orders gekko was in charleston this weekend and i saw all the 787's. i love charleston. >> my favorite american city. cityde new york, the best in the world. >> you see them lined up with all kinds of different livery. is -- boeing is playing hardball. boeing has gone across america and said what ever states are interested in this business, show us a bid. >> yeah, show us a bid. >> so it is not like a typical fight between union and employers, traditionally one side giving ground. boeing has threatened the union, if you vote in favor -- if you do not vote in favor of the contract, we may talk -- we may take all of the 777's out of the state. the 737's.as some of which is really the workforce. is the one that southwest airlines flies that you are familiar with. there is a lot at stake. it is not just bo
the technology sector, financial services has regained some of its footing. health care is a high-growth industry. in terms of broader -- i do not think that is going away anytime soon. people are taking temporary work whether they want to. or because the longer-term, full-time opportunities do not exist. probably one of the most important dynamics that we track is the skills gap in the widening skills gap. a lot of people do not realize where unemployment is roughly at 7.5%, there's over 3.8 million available jobs today in the u.s. one of the things that has happened is opportunities are being created by virtue of new technologies. but technologies are evolving so rapidly that it is challenging to train people to keep up with the technology that is being created. >> a lot of jobs are being automated and will not come back. it is not -- the growth of new jobs is not equal to the loss of jobs. a lot of people are wondering where their place is in the world. door have to be a data scientist to be -- to get a job -- do i have to be an engineer or a data scientist to get a job? >> roughly two thirds
decentralized digital currency. >> will technology prevail? >> we are talking about something that could change life as we know it. >> innovation, that's our show tonight. >> now john stossel. >> all right i take it for granted. i take it for granted i can press a button on my key chain and start a car and to find out how to get where i am supposed to be doing by gms system talks to me. i don't even think about that as being special any more. i take it for p granted i can cook my foods in minutes. but disabled people now have better ways of getting around. so what innovations are coming next? james canton should know. he makes his living as a futurist. he started the institute for global studies. so what is next? >> what's next is robots that clean your house and also find businesses and new customers for you. also maybe you will piggyback on the hyper loop and selling trends and tickets through e-commerce. what's next is nanotechnology, computers, robotics, really the limits are unlimited. the barriers are not even there for the entrepreneurs of the future. >> so you mentioned the hyper lube.
. given that it is the 21st century and a new technology, it is time to do something new. >> i serve on the system board of trustees and the problem for us is our success. consequence, our willingness to dramatically change our behavior. we have been debating the last number of years about this new crisis, the lack of state support for higher education. butis is an overused word, we cut, for example, the uc budget by over $2 billion. as a consequence, the last six ,ears, we have doubled tuition more than tripled since 2001. the concern is now with quality because we are not paying the faculty what other private unities -- universities are paying. and so all of these things are now creating an opportunity to have a different conversation. a conversation that sebastian has been on the forefront of. this world and this idea of online education is taking shape and taking a lot of traction. the debate is a long overdue and formidable one. >> your own staff invited you not to get on stage. >> when things are going well, you want to get along. there is a lot of mixed reviews on higher educa
cover the technology and media companies that are reshaping our world. our focus is on innovation, technology, and the future of business. let's get straight to the rundown. to facebook users file a lawsuit against the social network saying it's scanning private messages to better target advertising. facebook calls the lawsuit without merit. hackers expose the names and numbers of millions of snap chap users after a security form says it's warned him about von ability. will it be lights out for major nfl playoffs this weekend? three games are in danger of a blackout unless the stadium's sellout in time. first, to the lead -- facebook hit with a privacy lawsuit. two users complain facebook scanned some private user messages and then profits off the data by sharing it with advertisers. the plaintiffs are seeking class-action status and say it violates federal and california law. facebook says the allegations are without merit. facebook is not the first company to face these kinds of allegations. google and yahoo! face allegations of intercepting user communications. our bloomberg co
>> from pier three in san francisco welcome to bloomberg west were recovered the global technology and media that is reshaping our world. this weekend we bring you a special year-end edition of the best of west. over the next hour we showcase some of our top interviews with the power players in technology and media from the last year, including the ceos of linkedin,'s ebay and disney to highlight just a few. we spoke with industry innovators about the future of technology. we begin with one of the top stories and companies of 2013, twitter and its ipo. the social blogging site began trading on the new york stock exchange. the seven-year-old company has had a storied history, its came together to celebrate the next chapter. they were joined by twitter's iconic with him on the floor and asked him about the ipo process. >> i think the thing that surprised me most about the ipo almost is the spectacular understanding of the service that so many of the investors we met with across the country had. i would go to meetings with potential investors and these are meetings were i am going in
." our focus is innovation, technology, and the future of business. let's get straight to the rundown. google, hoping that connected cars will hit the fast lane, starting new partnerships with gm, audi, and other carmakers, trying to make the connected car or reality. t-mobile, spending billions on airways to better carry it signal and steal from the competition after at&t are the offered the credits to more users. the company behind the world's for bitcoin, atm launching in taiwan. how does a bitcoin atm even work? first, the lead, google is joining forces with carmakers to start the open automotive alliance, to customize software for use as an information entertainment system. a number of different carmakers have signed up. gm, audi. the chipmaker is nvidia. at the be a big scene consumer electronics show this year, this week. the managing director of free low advisors is with us today. joining us by skype, john leonard, professor of mechanical engineering at m.i.t. and an expert on connected cars. how, exactly, would this work? the alliance between google and the carmakers? they ar
spirit. herex. patents are a popular area right now because all the technology companies need the legal wherewithal to use them. how did you get into the patented business? judge, general a litigation at a large firm and one day, many years back, a client walked in and needed some help with some electoral property. that is how i wound up backing -- back into this line of is this helping effectuate a sale and prop up his company and send him on his way and became the firm expert on patent modernization. >> you helped close a $60 million deal to buy patents from this rockstar consortium, how did that happen? >> circuitously. a good friend of mine who is head of -- vice president of business development at rockstar, we went to law school together. we went our separate ways and reconnected about a year ago. as we reconnected we started talking trying to put a deal together. how do you merge the public markets with -- which is what they are. and nasdaq traded company with the traditional private sector of patent assertion or patent licensing. we started working to gather it -- together and c
capital. he spoke at the techcrunch disrupt operant about the technological revolution he calls the data factory. ♪ [applause] >> good morning. you can tell we are sitting right here in the center of the world technology because this little clicker doesn't work wirelessly. a bell andcted to then to a light and there's a gentleman that actually moves the slides along, so here we are, right in the center of the technology universe. thank you very much for having sequoia here in the conference this morning. i want to spend the next bit of time sharing some work all of us at sequoia have done over the last year or so trying to distill our thoughts about where we are investing and how we are investing. share a few ideas with you that are a little rough i hopethe edges, but will give everyone the sense that right here between san francisco and san jose, something utterly remarkable has been going on, is going on and will go on -- something that has only occurred in one or two other places in the whole course of human history. like to go would back and give you a snapshot of life as it was in
is innovation in technology and the future of business. let's get straight to the rundown. from alaska to meet your -- just green light.he business opportunities for the robots in the sky. share buyback plan before shareholders. then he urges shareholders not to vote for it. could apple have a plan to put 100 40s is billion dollars in cash to work? 2013 comes to a close. we will sit down with eric schmidt to find out what he sees for technology and innovation. first, to the lead. in the effort to get drones to the nation, skies are about to take off. drone testing sites in six states. the sites are located in new york, alaska, nevada, texas, and virginia. also in hawaii and new jersey and oregon. the congressionally mandated test sites will conduct critical research into operational requirements necessary to safely aircraft unmanned systems into international airspace over the next several years. our reporter has been following this story out of d.c.. >> we do nottes? exactly know. the faa said they were trying to select a diverse number of sites . they went to alaska so they could get the sev
's largest technology companies today calling upon president obama and congress to implement sweeping reforms to stop further surveillance. the coalition saying that there is an urgent need to change spying practices. because according to microsoft people who use technology that they don't trust. and there is some irony in this statement when we look atall of the cyberattacks on technology around the country. and a new report about just how extensive the national security agency spying really is. they reportedly spent years spying on online gamers, including those playing world of warcraft. on xbox live. the outrage. obamacare architect ezekiel emanuel said young people haven't signed up for coverage because the obama administration hasn't sufficiently promoted it. my next guest says that he could not rate a greater piece of fiction in the obamacare narrative. we are joined by best-selling conservative author brd the thor. his latest book is called hidden order and it's great to have you with us. >> what it is saying is that obamacare works if you are rich. you will have access to the health
more mature than in the past. maturity being both from a product perspective, technology perspective, markets. some of them are market leaders in their fields and some of them have a large stake in market acquired.g when you acquire a company that is much more mature, your billing to pay a higher price the fact> and also that u.s. companies have a lot of money and they are chasing innovation and this is where they find it. >> it was definitely a sellers market. a lot of the israeli companies have and join the competition over the acquisitions which also may the prices higher. it's really the right time, the thet combination of companies that brought 2013 to where it is. tothey may be waiting longer sell with higher prices. should they not be selling at all and building these big israeli companies that everyone from investors and entrepreneurs aim?telling me is now the >> this is a debate that has been going on for many, many years. i can tell you my is and i think today there's almost no reason to doubt that exits are good for israel. the fact that companies are being sold is good fo
'm emily chang. is on innovation, technology, and the future of business. snap chat users exposed. hackers say they posted user names and phone numbers for millions of users. it was a security flaw that they have been warned about. 2013 was a huge year for netflix with soren shares and hit original programming, but what can ceo reed hastings do to keep the momentum going? a massive snowstorm is west butng the mid businesses hoping to stay ahead with new smart files. a problem that will not vanish anytime soon for snapchat. hackers broke into a database and swiped 4.6 million user names and phone numbers. the information was published on redditt. the site was later taken down. in august, they were warned that they were vulnerable. at butched out to snapch have not yet heard back. is aar to talk about it security and private researcher at the american civil liberties union. he is in washington, d.c. joining us from cleveland is the ceo of tusted sec. >> this is a bad incident primarily because users are using the service because they think the company protects their privacy and security, but
it is. this is a very unusual piece of technology. it almost looks like an alien insect. they've got it in a hangar and they're going to fly it up to yosemite and going to be eyes in the sky to generate action from the ground. let's check it out. the size and scope of the wildfire burning in yosemite national park is astounding. larger than the city of chicago at a cost of more than $100 million. the fire that is destroying hundreds of square miles of sensitive ecosystem habitat, for assistance in controlling this inferno, firefighters are turning to the u.s. military for help. called into service and flying high above the flames and smoke of yosemite is the m 1 drone. following tours in iraq and afghanistan, the predator's eye in the sky, remotely piloted aircraft starts its mission east of los angeles. on first thought it's just a completely unusual piece of technology. it looks like a strange alien bug. it's extremely ea aerodynamic fm almost a different planet. >> it is an mq 1 drone aircraft. 55 feet long, bigger than your average general aviation ition . >> i see one camera her
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 921 (some duplicates have been removed)